42 CLINICIAN SATISFACTION WITH USING 3D PRINTED PHANTOMS TO LEARN ULTRASOUND-GUIDED PERCUTANEOUS VENOUS ACCESS
Shazia Sharif1, Kishore Minhas2, Daniil Niktichev3, James Ip4, Anne Ho2, Samantha Chippington2, Premal Patel2
1Department of Paediatric Surgery, The Royal London Hospital, London, United Kingdom. 2Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. 3Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London, United Kingdom. 4Department of Anaesthesia, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom

Abstract

Aim:

Ultrasound-guided percutaneous venous access (UPVA) has been demonstrated to result in the need for fewer vascular access attempts and increased long-term vessel patency. The aim of this study was to design a course for clinicians to learn UPVA in a risk-free environment using 3D printed vascular access models.

 

Methods:

A pilot course (3 hours)was designed by 1 paediatric surgeon and 2 radiologists. Short lectures on basic principles and the evidence-base of venous access were followed by 3 hands-on stations to learn and practice approaches to UVPA (in-plane and out-of-plane). Commercially available and in-house produced wall-less vessel phantoms were produced using 3D printed chambers and agar as a soft-tissue mimicking material. Feedback forms were completed by all attendees.

 

Results:

There were 13 attendees with a range of clinical experience: 11 trainees (1 core trainee and 10 ST trainees/clinical fellows), 1 consultant and 1 clinical nurse specialist. Background specialities were Surgery (1), CICU (5), PICU (4), NICU (1), Anaesthetics (1).

Participants rated the relevance of the course to their clinical work (1= strongly disagree, 5=strongly agree). The median score was 5 (range 4-5). Participants rated the course overall (1= poor, 5=outstanding). The course was rated as outstanding; median score of 5 (range 4-5).

Multiple phantoms were produced using two 3D printed materials costing £3 (low-resolution) and £44 (high-resolution) per phantom these were filled with agar costing <£1 each. The 3D printed components of these phantoms are re-useable. The costs of commercial reusable vascular access phantoms are typically >£1000.

 

Conclusion:

3D printed vascular phantoms are an excellent design that can be used to teach the UPVA technique prior to further clinical training. 3D printed phantoms provide a cost-effective and transportable tool that facilitates the possibility of teaching the technique at different training centres.


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